Port Infrastructure Works

In recent years, the dredging industry went through in-depth innovations. Jan De Nul Group enlarged its vessels, gave them more storage capacity and made them more powerful. The on-board technology has become more sophisticated enabling vessels to operate in a more cost-efficient, safer and more accurate manner.

This innovation was boosted by the market evolution of the past years: clients award their port infrastructure works to one contractor or joint venture through all-in contracts, including design and engineering. The client expects from the contractor that he delivers creative and innovative solutions.

Thanks to its multidisciplinary approach Jan De Nul is able to manage and execute these large-scale projects within the preset and required time frames.

 

Peru, Execution of works for the improvement and widening of the entrance to the terminal of the Port of Callao

Widening of the entrance of the Port of Callao by relocation and demolition of part of the north and southern breakwater
Dredging of the Entrance Channel and Turning Circle till -16m
...

Widening of the entrance of the Port of Callao by relocation and demolition of part of the north and southern breakwater
Dredging of the Entrance Channel and Turning Circle till -16m
Placing Buoys in the new configuration of the Port of Callao

Key figures
Country

Peru

Client's name

Autoridad Portuaria Nacional

Contractor's role

Main Contractor

Period
November 1, 2010 to July 12, 2011

Australia, Port Botany Expansion Project

In Port Botany, near Sydney, Jan De Nul Group and its Australian partner Baulderstone ...

In Port Botany, near Sydney, Jan De Nul Group and its Australian partner Baulderstone were responsible for the design and construction of a 63 hectare extension of the existing container terminal at Botany Bay. The scope also included capital dredging of the access channel.

 

Key figures
Country

Australia

Client's name

Sydney Ports Corporation

Contractor's role

Joint Venture Partner (part JDN 26 %)

Period
January 7, 2008 to June 17, 2011

Oman, Construction of the new Port of Duqm

A consortium with Jan De Nul Group was responsible for the construction of a new port and drydock complex at Duqm, Oman. The contract covered the construction of breakwaters and quay walls,...

A consortium with Jan De Nul Group was responsible for the construction of a new port and drydock complex at Duqm, Oman. The contract covered the construction of breakwaters and quay walls, dredging and reclamation. This major port expansion created adequate capacity to cope with future expansion, as well as with the handling of larger cargo vessels at the port. The upgrade also enhances and improves commercial operations at Duqm.

 

 

Key figures
Country

Oman

Client's name

Directorate General of Ports and Maritime Affairs
Ministry of Transport and Communications

Contractor's role

Consortium Partner (part JDN 44 %)

Technical specs
Equipment

CSDs J.F.J. De Nul, Leonardo Da Vinci, Fernão de Magalhães, Marco Polo
Splithopper barges L'Aigle, La Boudeuse, Magellano, Verrazzano, Nijptangh, Geelvinck, Weseltje, Santiago, Le Guerrier
TSHDs Francis Beaufort, Taccola, Leiv Eiriksson, Galilei 2000, Juan Sebastián de Elcano, Cristóbal Colón, De Lapérouse

Scope

Construction of Breakwaters including concrete wave walls (main breakwater: 4 km, Lee breakwater: 4.5 km)
Dredging the entrance channel, harbour basin, turning circle and areas at the berths and floating docks
Reclamation behind the breakwaters, quay walls and inshore, including ground treatment
Construction of reveted slopes within the harbour
Construction of quay walls for commercial vessels
Construction of quay walls for Naval and Coast Guard vessels

Soil

Siltstone, silt, sand and clay.

Volume

Dredging: 62,000,000 m³
Reclamation: 12,000,000 m³

Dredging depth

-19.0 m outside, -18.0 m inside the harbour

Rock works

4,300,000 m³
46,000 units of artificial blocks: 2 types of concrete armour blocks "Core Lock" of 3 m³ (7.2 tonnes) and 8.5 m³ (20.5 tonnes)
Armour rock: 0.5 till 3 tonnes

Quay walls

A commercial quay is constructed with a total length of 2.3 km and a return wall of 150 m length + a Government berth with a quay wall of 1.1 km
Approx. 6,000 concrete blocks precast on site (commercial quay and return wall) + 2,000 precast concrete blocks (Government berth)

Dry earth works

Soil improvement works, compaction

Other works

Environmental monitoring, hydraulic studies